Broken Light: A Photography Collective

We are photographers living with or affected by mental illness; supporting each other one photograph at a time. Join our community, submit today!

The Ins And Outs Of Thinking

Photo taken by Taylor J. a 28-year-old contemporary photographic artist located near Nashville, Tennessee. For various reasons in his nearly teens Taylor was placed in a psychiatric institution. It was there that Taylor learned to use art as a coping devise. Years later he began a career as a commercial photographer mainly shooting ads for restaurants. Becoming unfulfilled by his work, he soon decided to drop everything and pursue the fine art side of photography. He wanted to create photographs that were truly expressive, so he decided to do something completely different with photography. Taylor began exploring new photographic methods that would allow him to escape the viewfinder and create images from imagination and memory. This has ultimately resulted in the development of a distinct style of work he calls Photographic Surreal Impressionism. The images are completely photographic in nature and created using various techniques that Taylor has developed through his own trial and error. There is no digital manipulation nor the use of any other medium involved in the production of his photographs. It very important to Taylor that he create his photos honestly as he believes it gives his work a more organic feel and sense of integrity.

About this photo: “This photograph titled, “The Ins and Outs Of Thinking” is meant to portray the frenzy of thoughts that can often turn into a full blown panic attack.  At times starting with one thought or worry, I use it to work myself into hysteria .  Other times I am hit out of the blue at no fault of my own. This usually takes place at inactive times, driving in the car or laying in bed at night.   The first few times I had a panic attack I did not even realize what was happening to me.  I confused the symptoms of breathless, dizziness and chest pain with some type of physical problem, believing I had a respiratory or heart condition.  Thankfully,  I now recognize the onset of anxiety and do a better job of winding myself down and avoiding an attack.

Find more from Taylor at his blog 

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6 comments on “The Ins And Outs Of Thinking

  1. Paula McLane Jennings
    May 28, 2014

    the colors and light quality are absolutely stunning!

    Like

  2. Mabel Kwong
    May 29, 2014

    This is such a stunning and expressive photo. Well done to Taylor. As one who suffers from panic attacks, I feel that this image reaches out to me, reaching out to me the feelings of confusion, blinding pulsating light, head going around in circles…and relief when the panic attack is over. Maybe that’s why the photo has such vibrant colours – symbolising everything will be okay in the end.

    Like

  3. EvaUhu
    May 29, 2014

    awesome!

    Like

  4. taylorjorjorian
    May 29, 2014

    I appreciate it.
    Thank you for sharing your thoughts Mabel, I love your interpretation!

    Like

  5. luro97
    May 30, 2014

    Your art definitely expresses the feeling. I spent so many years not knowing what I was suffering from. Thank you for this photo.

    Like

  6. WeaverGrace
    June 3, 2014

    Wow: “no digital manipulation nor the use of any other medium”! I want to know more!

    I can relate to the colors and movement; the churning within while all around is flowing calmly.

    Like

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